PORTLAND: International Film Festival

FILMS & SCHEDULES – ROMANIA
PIFF38


THE JAPANESE DOG
THE JAPANESE DOG
DIRECTOR: TUDOR CHRISTIAN JURGIU – ROMANIA

This year’s Romanian submission for the Best Foreign Language Film Oscar, this subtle and movingly told tale of loss and recovery is reminiscent of the work of Japanese master Yasujiro Ozu. Recent floods in rural southern Romania have swept away 80-year-old Costache’s wife and all of their belongings. Now, after a 20-year absence, his estranged son Ticu arrives with his Japanese wife and young son. The unexpected visit forces father and son to relearn how to rebuild their relationship. Costache becomes a real grandfather to his seven-year-old grandson, while Ticu straightens out past mistakes. “A satisfying, unexpectedly upbeat film, superbly played, in which hope is always just about visible through the tragedy.”—The Hollywood Reporter. In Romanian and Japanese with English subtitles.


QUOD ERAT DEMONSTRANDUM
QUOD ERAT DEMONSTRANDUM
DIRECTOR: ANDREI GRUZSNICKI – ROMANIA

The story of the man on the edge becomes a film about people who are at crossroads. Set in Romania, 1984, a mathematician’s decision to publish a paper in a magazine, edited by an American university and not asking for the authorities’ permission, triggers a chain of events that will change his friends’ lives. After all, decisions with no consequences do not exist. What follows is a tense story of paranoia and betrayal—skillfully shot in black and white with remarkable attention to period details—in which the issues explored are anything but black and white. “The film tries to reproduce the nostalgia and immobility of those years.”—Andrei Gruzsnicki. “The villains here are sincere, hard-working bureaucrats, and their victims are frequently confused or duplicitous.”—New York Times.


WAITING FOR AUGUST

Georgiana Halmac is about to turn 15. She lives with her six brothers and sisters in a social housing condo on the outskirts of Bacau, Romania. When their mother Liliana is forced to leave the family to work in Italy, Georgiana is abruptly catapulted into the role of the head of the family, and her adolescence is cut brutally short. History is repeating itself in Romania, says the filmmaker Mihai, who as a child saw her parents flee the Ceaus¸escu regime, leaving her behind until they could send for her. Referred to as the “home alone generation,” children today are being left behind due to economic migration as people are forced to leave the country annually to work abroad. Best Documentary, Karlovy Vary International Film Festival. First feature.


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